Commentary

  • GSA proposed rule raises ‘significant concerns’ over competition

    A system that seeks to drive down pricing through constant comparison of individual transactions leads to a downward or death spiral in pricing that is inconsistent with the dynamics of the commercial marketplace, acquisition expert Roger Waldron says in a new commentary about the proposed rule.

  • Why BRAC is good news for VA, but bad news for DoD and the Postal Service

    Veterans Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald seems to be closing the deal several secretaries of Defense and at least one postmaster general couldn’t, says Federal News Radio’s Francis Rose in a new commentary.

  • Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP

    Precise as it might be, sometimes contract language doesn’t quite cover a particular situation. While it would probably make a contractor’s life easier to just stick to the contract language, that’s not always an option. Tim Sullivan is a partner at the law firm Thompson Coburn, and author of the blog, “A Government Contractor’s 10 Commandments.” On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, he tackled the ninth commandment: Be prepared to reciprocate. It’s not just the words on the page that matter; it’s the relationship between a contractor and the government customer.

  • Contracting Commandment 9: Thou shalt be flexible and cooperative

    One of the most difficult things to learn is when and where to be flexible in terms of performing a contract, but it’s critical if you want to succeed in the long run, says contracting expert Tim Sullivan in a new commentary.

  • Earth to House GOP: Messing with DHS ain’t governing

    The only solution that will demonstrate House Republican leaders are serious about governing is to put a fully-funded DHS bill on the floor right away, says In Depth host Francis Rose.

  • How to unleash the full potential of GSA’s Federal Supply Schedules

    The full potential of the FSS program remains untapped, says Roger Waldron, president of the Coalition for Government Procurement. In a new commentary, he offers two key contracting reforms he believes will bring the program into the 21st century.

  • DHS shutdown twofer: Burning money and morale at the same time

    Former DHS chief human capital officer Jeff Neal talks about the real costs behind shutting down an agency.

  • Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP

    A good reputation might be a government contractor’s most valuable asset. That makes maintaining integrity one of the most important activities. So says Tim Sullivan, a partner at the law firm Thompson Coburn, and author of the blog, “A Government Contractor’s 10 Commandments.” On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, he tackled the eighth commandment: Thou shall maintain thy integrity. It might seem like common sense, but it’s impossible to overstate its importance.

  • Will new Federal CIO Tony Scott make feds eat dog food?

    Federal News Radio’s Tom Temin asks if ‘dogfooding’ can help federal IT.

  • Eighth Commandment: Thou shalt maintain thy contracting integrity

    Personal integrity should never be confused with the federal government’s insistence that its contractors have codes of conduct. Integrity starts with you, says procurement expert Tim Sullivan.

  • A race to the bottom: How lowest price, technically acceptable is shortchanging agencies

    Agencies are doing themselves a disservice by looking mainly for the lowest bid, says Moe Jafari, the president and CEO of HumanTouch, in a new commentary.

  • What does it mean when the government ‘closes’ due to weather?

    Is it fair to make teleworking federal employees work during a snow day when the rest of the government is closed? Jeff Neal, former Chief Human Capital Officer of the Homeland Security Department, thinks so.

  • Contracting Commandment No. 7: Thou shalt avoid hostility

    Running into problems with a contract? Choosing diplomacy over hostility is the smart move, says acquisition expert Tim Sullivan in a new commentary.

  • Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP

    Dealings between contractors and the government can get difficult and contentious. Yet it’s important to keep discussions from getting overly nasty or personal. It may be tempting at times, but it will cost you in the long run. That’s according to Tim Sullivan, a partner at the law firm Thompson Coburn and author of the blog, “A Government Contractor’s 10 Commandments.” On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, he tackled the seventh commandment: Thou shall avoid hostilities. Even though there are processes for protests, disputes and appeals, a contractor should exercise caution and restraint when pursuing these avenues.