Government Shutdown

Government Shutdown

  • Under shutdown, a complicated picture emerges for contractor employees

    Service contractors will continue to work as long as they don’t need supervision by government employees, if their contracts are unaffected by the absence of a 2014 budget, and as long as they can actually get into their worksites.

  • Feds expected to report Tuesday even if shutdown occurs

    Federal workers will still have to report to work for about four hours Tuesday even if the government shuts down.

  • The Fiscal Year End – A look back at 2013 and a look forward to 2014

    Mike Causey joins hosts Bob Leins and Tammy Flanagan for an animated discussion on the fiscal year, what 2013 brought us and what we might expect in 2014. September 30, 2013

  • Agency websites, other technology to go dark during shutdown

    OMB and GSA put out separate memos detailing steps agencies should take if the government shuts down. OMB reminded agencies to secure systems and how to deal with third-party social media sites. GSA gave agencies ideas to minimize the impact of having to shutdown websites.

  • Agency-by-agency shutdown guidance

    What’s your agency’s shutdown plan? Federal News Radio provides links to each agency’s guidance in the event of a government shutdown.

  • Shutdown again or not?

    If you’ve been in government for at least two years, this is not your first shutdown rodeo. If you have been around a long time, you’ve been to the brink a lot, Senior Correspondent Mike Causey says. But even if one (or even both) sides blink, this is going to happen again. Soon.

  • DoD would furlough roughly half of civilian workforce during shutdown

    Pentagon guidance says military members will report to work as normal under a government shutdown, and most employees working under service contracts would be unaffected as well. But about half the civilian workforce would be told to stay home without pay.

  • Lessons from shutdowns past

    Despite coming close in 2011, a government shutdown hasn’t occurred since 1996. Frank Reeder, who was director of the Office of Administration of the White House in the Clinton administration at the time, said one of the most challenging aspects was managing the morale of the federal workforce.

  • Feds learn furlough status as shutdown looms

    Federal employees began learning Friday whether they’ll be forced to stay home if the government shuts down next week. Supervisors were tasked with informally telling employees today whether they are classified as “essential” or “nonessential,” according to several federal-employee unions briefed by the Obama administration. Congress is prepared to work through the weekend, but the clock is ticking down for lawmakers to agree on a funding bill keeping the lights on at agencies beyond Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year.

  • Air Force warns industry to expect delayed acquisition decisions

    The Air Force says budget uncertainty will mean a lot of delayed contracting decisions in the first portion of 2014. Meanwhile, the service is hurriedly trying to spend every last dollar in its 2013 procurement accounts.

  • Preparing for shutdown, government plans furloughs

    A government shutdown could furlough 800,000 federal employees. The shutdown could hit as early as Tuesday if a bitterly divided Congress fails to approve a temporary spending bill to keep the government running.

  • Football vs. Congress: When in doubt, punt

    In politics, as in football, sometimes the best move is to punt. And even if you are not a sports fan or political junkie consider what Congress and the Washington football team have in common: So far this season both are losers. The difference is the football team is bound to win one while Congress keeps failing to score and punting, Senior Correspondent Mike Causey says.

  • DHS warns contractors about shutdown consequences

    EPA also issues guidance to agencies, and OPM updates the governmentwide shutdown guidance.

  • Shutdown roulette – what are the real effects on government?

    What will a government shutdown really mean for federal employees and government HR offices if it goes into effect next week? Advice from someone who knows – former DHS Chief Human Capital Officer Jeff Neal.