Navy

  • Multiyear contract is a big boon to Boeing

    The Navy strikes a deal to lump together all the fighter jets it plans to purchase over the next several years into a single large buy, in a victory for aerospace giant Boeing. Dr. Jacques Gansler, former undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, explains.

  • SPAWAR breaks ground on $9.5M tech lab

    DoD Cyber Commander confirmed, Safari bug found

  • Navy finds value engineering at sea

    We continue our series on the Defense Value Engineering Achievement Awards with a look at Littoral Combat Ship Mission Modules with program manager, Capt. Michael Good.

  • Navy may get a name change

    The Navy may be changing its name soon from the Department of the Navy to the Department of the Navy and the Marine Corps. Jodi Schneider, Senior Editor in the Washington Bureau of the American Banker, has details on this an what else is moving on the Hill.

  • Unmanned Aerial Technology

    The U.S. Military’s unmanned aerial technology is becoming the envy of other nations. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates has confirmed several allied nations…including Britain, Canada, Spain, Japan and South Korea… have all expressed interest in drone technology.

    Each branch of the military has different uses for U-A-V’s or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Rear Admiral Terry Kraft says the drones capabilities in persistence and covertness are particularly impressive. And, he says, unmanned Systems will be included in the Navy’s 2011 budget and beyond.

    They’re in the process of introducing several new systems now, including the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System (or BAMS), the Navy version of the Global Hawk.

    In 2012, the Navy anticipates a breakthrough development when they land an unmanned tail-less aircraft onboard an aircraft carrier.

  • Navy has big plans for the little UAV

    As the Navy considers fielding a stealthy unmanned combat aircraft as part of a carrier strike group as early as 2018, the rest of the world wants UAVs too! We get an update from the Director of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Capabilities for the Navy, Rear Admiral Terry Kraft

  • Military academies are looking for leadership of the future

    The 2010 academy nomination season now is open. We get details from Captain Eric Brown, Assistant Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy.

  • Cyber Command

    As the Defense Department’s proposed Cyber Command awaits confirmation hearings on its proposed commander, the services are moving forward to establish their own cyber organizations. Vice Admiral Barry McCullough reported for duty on January 29th as Commander of the newly reconstituted 10th Fleet, officially standing up the U.S. Navy’s Fleet Cyber Command.

  • Navy damns the stovepipes, goes full speed ahead on IT reorganization

    The Navy is consolidating its intelligence directorate, communications networks and related information technology capabilities to form a single new organization: the deputy chief of naval operations for information dominance.

  • Going Green, Winning Gold: Navy earns Presidential Energy Award

    Recognizing individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities.

  • Algae helps Navy go green

    Algae could soon help the Navy move towards its goal of becoming more energy independent. The Defense Energy Support Center announced a contract with Solazyme to develop an alternative fuel using the substance. Rick Kamin…

  • Agencies trying to find balance between Web 2.0, cybersecurity

    Coast Guard wants to set up separate network to use social media sites. CIO Council looking at cybersecurity implications of these tools.

  • Work is Fun for SAMMIE Nominee

    Sniffing the air for anthrax has never been more high-tech. Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have come up with sensors that can diagnose infectious diseases, track airborne toxins and even detect explosives in…

  • Back to the future

    Its back to the future for the American space program. NASA is currently testing the next-generation Orion spacecraft, designed replace the space shuttle. If the cone shape looks familiar, its because its almost identical to the Apollo lunar modules. The Orion is now being tested at the Navy’s Surface Warfare Center in Bethesda, Maryland. And instead of landing like a shuttle, Orion will splash down like Apollo. I’m Max Cacas