Workforce Rights/Governance

  • What has Congress done for you lately?

    Jessica Klement, legislative director for the National Active and Retired Federal Employees association, joins host Mike Causey for a look at how members of Congress voted on legislation that matters to feds. October 15, 2014

  • Jessica Klement, Legislative Director, NARFE

    Next month, 399 representatives and 28 senators seek re-election. That means federal employees can oversee and grade the people who oversee and grade their agencies. The National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association releases its annual scorecard in time for the election. It keeps tabs on the 113th Congress and how it votes on key legislation affecting federal employees. Jessica Klement, legislative director of NARFE, tells In Depth with Francis Rose about some of those key votes.

  • VA begins process to remove executive at center of FedBid scandal

    Sloan Gibson, VA’s deputy secretary, said he’s proposed the removal of Susan Taylor, the deputy chief procurement officer at the Veterans Health Administration. Gibson will use the new authorities provided by Congress and President Barack Obama in August under the Veterans’ Access to Care through Choice, Accountability, and Transparency Act of 2014.

  • Hiring and managing millennials

    This week, Julie Perkins hosts a roundtable discussion of why government agencies should recruit and hire members of the millennial generation. October 3, 2014

  • NARFE finds votes impacting feds, retirees ‘more polarized than ever’

    Vermont and Rhode Island lawmakers were among those in Congress who consistently voted in favor of federal workers and retirees, according to the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association’s latest scorecard.

  • Will you be getting a new boss soon?

    Jennifer Mattingley, director of government affairs for Shaw Bransford and Roth will discuss job turnover in federal agencies, and Federal Times writer Andy Medici will talk about an increase in discrimination complaints in the federal government and the latest problem at the VA. October 1, 2014

  • Walter Shaub, Director, Office of Government Ethics

    The STOCK Act, the revolving door, the reverse revolving door: these are the reasons why the Office of Government Ethics is being more aggressive in its training of federal employees. Over the last year, OGE has offered 238 percent more training courses and hours then the year before. In part two of their interview, Walter Shaub, director of the Office of Government Ethics, told Federal News Radio Executive Editor Jason Miller how OGE is managing through this volatile environment.

  • Complex ethics environment pushes OGE to focus on basics

    Walter Shaub, the director of the Office of Government Ethics, said the agency is focusing on three areas in order to improve ethics training across government: communication, direct support to agency ethics officials and oversight.

  • OGE Director Shaub wants a stronger, more transparent ethics community

    The National Government Ethics Summit, sponsored by the Office of Government Ethics, highlighted basic and advanced training for federal ethics officials, as well as broader subjects, such as whistleblower retaliation, the Hatch Act and other legal issues. Walter Shaub, the director of OGE, wants training sessions such as these to bring the federal ethics community closer together.

  • Walter Shaub, Director, Office of Government Ethics

    The Office of Government Ethics is stepping out from behind the legal and policy curtain to help build a broader community, and it wants agency ethics officials and others to do the same. Walter Shaub, director of the Office of Government Ethics, says a month-long series of seminars and summits is part of a broader effort to change the view of ethics oversight across government. He spoke to Federal News Radio Executive Editor Jason Miller in part one of their interview.

  • VA has one ethics officer for every 18,674 employees

    The Office of Government Ethics says the Veterans Affairs Department needs to expand the legal team responsible for ensuring employees follow government ethics rules. The team has just 19 people, in a department of more than 342,000.

  • Support law enforcement: Ride & Run to Remember 2014

    Craig Floyd with the National Law Enforcement Officers Museum, and Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association President Jon Adler will give us an update on this year’s Ride & Run to Remember event. September 19, 2014

  • Carlton Hadden, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

    Federal agencies are too quick to dismiss employee discrimination charges, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The EEOC reversed a third of all cases dismissed by agencies between 2008 and 2012 without investigations or hearings. The agency received more than 1,500 dismissal appeals in fiscal 2012, and remanded nearly 700 back to agencies. Carlton Hadden is director of the Office of Federal Operations for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to discuss what federal managers can do to avoid having decisions overturned.

  • Jessica Klement, Legislative Director, NARFE

    The House of Representatives might pass a continuing resolution today. The Senate could then vote on a CR as early as tomorrow. That means in just a few days your agency could have some budget certainty. At least until the end of December. Jessica Klement is Legislative Director of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association. On In Depth with Francis Rose, she shared what she sees from the CR process.