Workforce Rights/Governance

  • Legislative roundtable

    Jenny Mattingley hosts a roundtable discussion of legislation on Capitol Hill that impacts federal workers. June 6, 2014

  • OSC investigating dozens of claims of whistleblower retaliation at VA

    The Office of Special Counsel is investigating more than three dozen claims of whistleblower retaliation at the scandal-rocked Veterans Affairs Department. The 37 cases OSC is investigating span VA facilities in 19 states. They include VA employees who say they’ve been retaliated against for disclosing a range of misconduct, including improper scheduling practices, the misuse of agency funds and inappropriately restraining patients, according to OSC.

  • When at first you don’t succeed … Give it up!

    When you try something 32,000 times, including 1,600 times in one 8-hour period and fail, there is a lesson there. And the lesson is that despite what you’ve read, heard and been taught, failure is an option. Especially if you work for the government, Senior Correspondent Mike Causey says.

  • Why feds keep losing their furlough appeals

    So far, all of the initial decisions stemming from the Merit Systems Protection Board gigantic caseload of furlough appeals have “affirmed the furlough action taken by the agency,” according to MSPB’s annual report for fiscal 2013 released last week.

  • Jessica Klement, Legislative Director, NARFE

    The door to come back to government and get paid for it is still open for federal retirees or current employees getting close. The House passes an amendment to the fiscal 2015 National Defense Authorization Act so federal agencies can keep re-hiring federal retirees without cutting into their pensions. Jessica Klement, legislative director of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association, joined In Depth with Francis Rose to explain the details of the provision and what it means for current and future federal retirees.

  • Performance management and the DATA act

    Jon Desenberg from the Performance Institute, Bethany Blakey of the Performance Improvement Council, and Hudson Hollister of the Data Transparency Coalitition will participate in a roundtable discussion of federal performance management and the DATA Act. May 23, 2014

  • Senators propose 3.3 percent federal pay hike to start in 2015

    Sens. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) and Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) introduced the Federal Adjustment of Income Rates (FAIR) Act Friday, calling for a 3.3 percent pay increase for federal employees for calendar year 2015. Federal employee union leaders praised the proposal, which would raise feds’ pay more than the 1 percent President Barack Obama introduced in his 2015 budget proposal. The bill is similar to one introduced in March by House Democrats.

  • What’s the latest on Capitol Hill?

    NARFE’s Chris Farrell joins host Mike Causey to talk about some of the bills introduced in Congress that affect federal workers. May 21, 2014

  • Shirine Moazed, Chief of Washington field office, Office of Special Counsel

    Your agency’s deadline for a Whistleblower Certification Program is June 1. Congress created the program in 2002 and the Obama Administration wants federal agencies to finish making it a standard part of their workforce policies. As part of our special report Trust Redefined: Reconnecting Government and its Employees, Shirine Moazed, chief of the Washington field office for the Office of Special Counsel, tells In Depth with Francis Rose how the certification program works and offers five steps to meet the deadline.

  • Are you violating the Hatch Act and you don’t even know it?

    Under the Hatch Act, federal employees face a number of restrictions when it comes to their political activity on and off the job. The law was originally designed to protect feds from political coercion.

  • Is hike in whistleblower claims a sign of progress or growing mistrust?

    The heads of both the Office of Special Counsel and Merit Systems Protection Board tell Federal News Radio as part of our special report, “Trust Redefined: Reconnecting Government and Its Employees,” that their increasing workloads could actually be a sign of progress, and that more employees feel protected enough to make whistleblower disclosures. However, an exclusive Federal News Radio survey reveals a wide chasm of trust remains when it comes to feds blowing the whistle at work.

  • Agency budget squeeze eroding trust between employees, management

    Susan Tsui Grundmann, chair of the Merit Systems Protection Board, said many federal employees filed furlough appeals last year because they said they didn’t trust that their managers were making the right spending decisions that could have fended off the need to furlough employees. This article is part of the Federal News Radio special report, Trust Redefined: Reconnecting Government and Its Employees.

  • Doug Nierle, Bryan Polisuk, Merit Systems Protection Board

    Even in 2014, sexual orientation is a touchy subject in the workplace. The Merit Systems Protection Board has just finished taking a comprehensive look at workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation and published the results in a report. MSPB’s General Counsel Bryan Polisuk and Project Manager Doug Nierle discussed the findings with Federal Drive hosts Tom Temin and Emily Kopp.

  • Celebrate Police Week 2014

    Jenny Mattingley hosts a roundtable discussion of National Police Week 2014, which is being held in Washington D.C. from May 11th through the 17th. May 9, 2014