Insight by Affigent, an Akima Company and Oracle

Smooth sailing: How to avoid cloud migration frustration

Federal agencies have clearly gotten the cloud memo. Agencies are storing and running more mission-critical workloads in the cloud than ever, typically relying on the “big three” federally authorized cloud providers.

While there are undeniable benefits of running workloads in the cloud, agencies also have begun to experience the frayed edges, including unanticipated costs and performance bottlenecks. In many cases, these issues are a result of the way the first major cloud providers originally built...

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Federal agencies have clearly gotten the cloud memo. Agencies are storing and running more mission-critical workloads in the cloud than ever, typically relying on the “big three” federally authorized cloud providers.

While there are undeniable benefits of running workloads in the cloud, agencies also have begun to experience the frayed edges, including unanticipated costs and performance bottlenecks. In many cases, these issues are a result of the way the first major cloud providers originally built their cloud infrastructure. At the time, the idea was simply to create as much efficiency as possible, which they accomplished by developing a model that shared servers among multiple parties. While this does increase efficiencies, this approach also can cause unanticipated latency.

During the first few years of cloud services, Oracle evaluated how the first generation cloud performed, and then took a step back and redesigned  its cloud offering from the ground up, taking the best of what existed and adding features and capabilities that would address the issues head-on. The result is Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI), a FedRAMP-compliant second generation cloud service designed to support high-performance, scale-up workloads of all types at the lowest cost possible.

To learn which agencies are taking note, read the full report.