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  • Complex ethics environment pushes OGE to focus on basics

    Walter Shaub, the director of the Office of Government Ethics, said the agency is focusing on three areas in order to improve ethics training across government: communication, direct support to agency ethics officials and oversight.

  • OGE Director Shaub wants a stronger, more transparent ethics community

    The National Government Ethics Summit, sponsored by the Office of Government Ethics, highlighted basic and advanced training for federal ethics officials, as well as broader subjects, such as whistleblower retaliation, the Hatch Act and other legal issues. Walter Shaub, the director of OGE, wants training sessions such as these to bring the federal ethics community closer together.

  • TechAmerica dismisses Mike Hettinger as head of public sector practice

    The industry association is once again in turmoil as it gets rid of Mike Hettinger, who was brought in to stabilize the association after a tumultuous year. TechAmerica brings in two consultants, Larry Allen and Bill Greenwalt, to handle the day-to-day activities of the organization in the meantime.

  • It happened to me: Diplomats recount stories of crisis and survival

    Diane Dillard picked up the pieces of the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon after it was bombed in 1983. Ambassador Bill Brown found himself at the heart of a Soviet Union spy scandal. And John Limbert survived the infamous 444-day Iran hostage crisis. In the inaugural edition of Federal News Radio’s new feature, Federal Voices, we hear from each of them, in their own words, about what those experiences were really like and how they survived to tell the tale.

  • IRS’ approach to big data focuses on business outcomes

    The office of compliance analytics at the IRS uses information, tools and analysis to help mission offices solve problems. Dean Silverman, a senior adviser to the IRS commissioner, said his office is trying to use these tools and approaches to improve the agency’s outcomes and to create a data-driven decision-making culture.

  • GSA changes plans, will keep service schedules open after all

    The General Services Administration tells Federal News Radio it no longer believes it’s necessary to close down its seven services schedules to new vendors while it puts together the consolidated professional services contracts. GSA is trying to make it easier for agencies to buy professional services and for vendors to sell their expertise.

  • GSA applying its IT model to overhaul of services schedules

    Tiffany Hixson, the Federal Acquisition Service’s professional services category executive, said the goal is to consolidate seven professional services schedules, such as MOBIS, FABS and professional engineering, into a handful of schedules. She said GSA is using the same approach for services as it did with IT by awarding the OASIS contracts to compliment the professional services schedule modernization.

  • Despite 50 years of progress, morale gap among LGBT workers persists

    Despite a series of efforts to expand the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender federal workers by the Obama administration, LGBT feds, who comprise about 3 percent of the federal workforce, are less satisfied, feel less empowered on the job and are less likely to rate their agency’s senior leaders and management as highly as their non-LGBT counterparts, according to a recent survey.

  • VA forming cadre of specially-trained acquisition workers

    Ford Heard, the Veterans Affairs associate deputy assistant secretary for Procurement Policy, Systems and Oversight, said his office will launch the acquisition corps and program management framework in the coming months to further professionalize the agency’s acquisition workforce. A Federal News Radio survey of chief acquisition officers and other senior acquisition managers says workforce training and retention remain among their biggest priorities and challenges.

  • DoD procurement chief Dick Ginman planning to retire

    Pentagon’s most senior contract policy official is set to retire soon, but schedule is uncertain.