Intelligence Community

  • Brennan says new CIA cyber branch part of digital evolution

    The CIA director said the agency is following the spy business into the digital realm, but it is not trying to step on other intelligence agencies’ turf.

  • Beyond cyber, feds need to read between SOTU lines

    President Barack Obama focused little on improving government management in his annual speech to Congress. Obama called on Congress to pass cyber legislation and said the administration will release a new report on surveillance and privacy safeguards.

  • One woman’s success inside the Intelligence Community

    Jill Singer, partner at Deep Water Point and former CIO of the National Reconnaissance Office, sits down with Women of Washington radio show hosts Aileen Black and Gigi Schumm, for a discussion about cloud computing and insider threats.

  • Collateral damage of Snowden leaks being felt in cyber, public trust

    Chief legal counselor to NSA says intelligence disclosures may have set back efforts to improve nation’s cybersecurity posture because of increasing unease about public-private cooperation, and that it’s time to reexamine the digital privacy trust relationship between government and the public.

  • Are agency insider threat programs getting off the ground?

    It’s hard to tell how many agencies are actually checking all the boxes on the Obama administration’s plan for detecting disgruntled or rogue employees. Agencies were supposed to have taken initial steps to set up insider threat programs by June 30, according to an update posted on Performance.gov. But it’s impossible to know the number of agencies who met the initial criteria so far. The progress update says that information is classified.

  • Gen. James Clapper, Director, National Intelligence

    The nation’s top intelligence official says transparency is going to have to be a feature of the intelligence community from now on. Gen. James Clapper, the director of national intelligence says that’s his main takeaway from the Edward Snowden leaks and their continuing fallout. Clapper is the guest on the latest edition of AFCEA Answers on Federal News Radio. In this excerpt, he told host Max Cacas he makes no apologies for the programs Snowden exposed, but intelligence agencies need to do a better job of explaining why they do what they do.

  • Pamela Walker, Information Technology Alliance for Public Sector

    Last week, President Obama signed the annual authorization bill for the U.S. Intelligence Community, making several changes to the way federal agencies and contractors deal with classified information and IT systems. Several of the provisions appear to be a reaction to the security clearance issues raised by the Edward Snowden case and by the Navy Yard shooting. Pamela Walker is senior director for homeland security at the Information Technology Alliance for Public Sector. She’s been analyzing the final bill, and joined In Depth with guest host Jared Serbu to talk about some of the provisions.

  • One woman’s success inside the Intelligence Community

    Jill Singer, partner at Deep Water Point and former CIO of the National Reconnaissance Office, sits down with Women of Washington radio show hosts Aileen Black and Gigi Schumm, for a discussion about cloud computing and insider threats.

  • Debra Roth, partner, Shaw, Bransford & Roth

    Perhaps nowhere in the federal workforce is trust more frail than in the intelligence community. It is still reeling from the revelations of former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The Director of National Intelligence recently issued two policies to clamp down on employees’ speech. The first says only a few authorized officials can talk with journalists. In this week’s Legal Loop, Tom and Emily looked at the policy’s impact on trust in the intelligence community as part of our special report, Trust Redefined: Reconnecting Government and Its Employees. Employment lawyer Debra Roth said on The Federal Drive the new policy stands out because it covers unclassified information.

  • Intel agencies determined to avoid another workforce ‘bathtub’ effect

    After a decade of increases to the intelligence community’s workforce, it’s time to cut back once again. But IC leaders say they’ll take a strategic approach this time around.