National Contract Management Association

  • Michael Fischetti: It’s time to de-clutter the contracting landscape

    The two-year budget and debt deal President Barack Obama signed may bring some certainty to the government business and contracting space, especially if Congress passes an omnibus spending bill for the rest of this fiscal year. But shutdowns, continuing resolutions and other budget problems have left a lot of clutter on the contracting landscape. Michael Fischetti, a fellow and executive director of the National Contract Management Association, wrote about clearing out that clutter.

  • The Ten Commandments of principle-centered winning

    Jim McCarthy, member of board of advisors, National Contract Management Association, outlines how vendors can win work within a code of morals.

  • GSA should not reinvent the data collection wheel

    On March 4, the General Services Administration issued a proposed rule that would require contractors to report transactional data from orders placed against GSA’s Federal Supply Schedule (FSS) contract vehicles as well as GSA’s governmentwide acquisition…

  • Michael Fischetti: Innovation is primarily a people issue

    Better Buying Power at the Pentagon is only one example of attempts to innovate in the acquisition space. The new acquisition corps that’s set up like the U.S. Digital Services office is another one, but it’s focused on policy and process. Michael Fischetti is executive director of the National Contract Management Association. He tells In Depth with Francis Rose that government spends too much time thinking about process — and not enough about people.

  • Acquisition workers as critical thinkers: A change that has to happen

    In Federal News Radio’s special report, Missing Pieces of Procurement Reform, the Defense Acquisition University, the Federal Acquisition Institute and other experts say a new kind of acquisition worker is needed. One that brings business acumen, understands technology and knows the FAR forward and back. The ever-evolving training regime for federal acquisition workers is no longer just about the hard skills of acquisition.

  • Air Force pins its future on ‘strategic agility’

    Service’s latest strategy document sees a future in which it will need to be more flexible and adaptable, including in its acquisition and personnel policies and organizational structures.

  • Contractor ethics rules too reactive, compliance focused, experts say

    Improving acquisition compliance and ethics may involve less rulemaking and more culture shaping according to panelists at the National Contract Management Association’s World Congress conference. At the conference, agency leaders discussed the need to streamline and pursue innovative approaches to federal acquisition policies.

  • GSA cuts 1,000 noncompliant vendors from IT schedule

    Kay Ely, GSA’s director of IT schedule programs in the Federal Acquisition Service, said removing 1,000 vendors who weren’t meeting the minimum annual sales requirement of $25,000 a year is saving the agency about $3.2 million a year in administrative costs. At the same time, GSA is adding 30-to-40 new vendors each month to Schedule 70 as part of its effort to make sure agency customers have access to new, innovative companies.

  • Mike Fischetti, Executive Director, National Contract Management Association

    Contractors are at the center of two out three major breaches of government trust over the past few years — Aaron Alexis, Edward Snowden and Julian Assange. And the Office of Management and Budget is looking at ways it can improve the federal background investigation process over the next few months. Mike Fischetti, executive director of the National Contract Management Association, talks to In Depth with Francis Rose s part of our special report, Trust Redefined: Reconnecting Government and Its Employees He tells Francis how the relationship between contractors and government is changing.

  • Federal contracts don’t manage themselves

    Charlie Chadwick, vice president for contracts and business conduct at BAE Systems, said that government and industry share the same goal of serving the public’s interest.