Tim Sullivan

  • Tim Sullivan: What can contractors expect in 2016?

    Record false claims recoveries, increases in minimum wages, rising protests of the big contracts, and new cybersecurity rules and sanctions, even putting tight budgets aside, it’s been a tough year for federal contractors. Federal Drive with Tom Temin turns to attorney Tim Sullivan of Thompson Coburn to find out what federal contractors can expect in 2016.

  • Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP

    The Small Business Administration is reopening the comment period for a rule proposed late last year. The SBA is trying to bring small business contracting rules in line with what was mandated by the 2013 Defense Authorization Act. But critics say the SBA’s approach is unfair to small businesses. Many of them would qualify as large businesses, while several large businesses could qualify as small. Tim Sullivan is a partner at the law firm Thompson Coburn and a long-time procurement attorney. He joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with his take.

  • Contracting Commandment 10: Thou shalt not stereotype thine opponent

    One of the most dangerous things that can happen to us in our business career is to make the mistake of stereotyping our adversary, says contracting expert Tim Sullivan. This commentary is the final installment of the 10-part series, 10 Commandments for Government Contractors.

  • Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP

    Pre-judging an opponent is a sure path to making a mistake in contract negotiating. That’s according to Tim Sullivan, a partner at the law firm Thompson Coburn. He’s also authored the blog, “A Government Contractor’s 10 Commandments.” On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, he tackled the 10th and final commandment: You shall not stereotype your opponent. That’s one of the biggest mistakes a contractor can make.

  • Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP

    Precise as it might be, sometimes contract language doesn’t quite cover a particular situation. While it would probably make a contractor’s life easier to just stick to the contract language, that’s not always an option. Tim Sullivan is a partner at the law firm Thompson Coburn, and author of the blog, “A Government Contractor’s 10 Commandments.” On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, he tackled the ninth commandment: Be prepared to reciprocate. It’s not just the words on the page that matter; it’s the relationship between a contractor and the government customer.

  • Contracting Commandment 9: Thou shalt be flexible and cooperative

    One of the most difficult things to learn is when and where to be flexible in terms of performing a contract, but it’s critical if you want to succeed in the long run, says contracting expert Tim Sullivan in a new commentary.

  • Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP

    A good reputation might be a government contractor’s most valuable asset. That makes maintaining integrity one of the most important activities. So says Tim Sullivan, a partner at the law firm Thompson Coburn, and author of the blog, “A Government Contractor’s 10 Commandments.” On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, he tackled the eighth commandment: Thou shall maintain thy integrity. It might seem like common sense, but it’s impossible to overstate its importance.

  • Eighth Commandment: Thou shalt maintain thy contracting integrity

    Personal integrity should never be confused with the federal government’s insistence that its contractors have codes of conduct. Integrity starts with you, says procurement expert Tim Sullivan.

  • Contracting Commandment No. 7: Thou shalt avoid hostility

    Running into problems with a contract? Choosing diplomacy over hostility is the smart move, says acquisition expert Tim Sullivan in a new commentary.

  • Tim Sullivan, Partner, Thompson Coburn LLP

    Dealings between contractors and the government can get difficult and contentious. Yet it’s important to keep discussions from getting overly nasty or personal. It may be tempting at times, but it will cost you in the long run. That’s according to Tim Sullivan, a partner at the law firm Thompson Coburn and author of the blog, “A Government Contractor’s 10 Commandments.” On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, he tackled the seventh commandment: Thou shall avoid hostilities. Even though there are processes for protests, disputes and appeals, a contractor should exercise caution and restraint when pursuing these avenues.