Lessons from Iraq, Afghanistan wars advance medical treatment

Even as the Iraq and Afghanistan wars recede into history, problems with traumatic brain injury endure. A study by researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that those injured before 2007 are most at risk for chronic problems. That was before Defense Department medical officials started more regular and detailed TBI screenings. Study co-author Rachel Chase from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health joined Pentagon Solutions with more.

If you can say anything good about battlefield wounds, it’s...

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rachel chase
Rachel Chase

Even as the Iraq and Afghanistan wars recede into history, problems with traumatic brain injury endure. A study by researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that those injured before 2007 are most at risk for chronic problems. That was before Defense Department medical officials started more regular and detailed TBI screenings. Study co-author Rachel Chase from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health joined Pentagon Solutions with more.

If you can say anything good about battlefield wounds, it’s this: They have often produced advances in emergency medical treatment that benefit not only troops but anyone who receives a similar injury. But only if the treatment experience is captured and taught. Fourteen years of hard-won learning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are in danger of evaporating. That’s according to former Surgeon General Richard Carmona. In this interview with Federal News Radio’s Eric White on Pentagon Solutions, Carmona explains why he thinks this is such an important issue.

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