News Team
Scott Maucione

Scott Maucione

Reporter

Scott Maucione is a defense reporter for Federal News Network and has worked in journalism for over a decade. He previously covered the Pentagon for Inside Defense. He received his B.A. in journalism and political science from the University of Maryland and his Master’s from American University in applied politics. 

(Staff Sgt. Kayla White/U.S. Air Force via AP)Todd Benson

The Air Force is filling its employment holes, looking to improve leadership

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Amelia Brust/Federal News Network

JAIC entering new phase of life, will create teams to help DoD adopt AI

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(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)FILE -  In this Sept. 18, 2009, file, photo, A soldier from the U.S. Army's 118th Military Police Co., based at Fort Bragg, N.C., respond to shots fired at a combat outpost in the Jalrez Valley in Afghanistan's Wardak Province.  Moscow and Washington are intertwined in a complex and bloody history in Afghanistan, with both suffering thousands of dead and wounded in conflicts lasting for years. Now both superpowers are linked again over Afghanistan, with intelligence reports indicating Russia secretly offered bounties to the Taliban to kill American troops there. But analysts suggest that the two adversaries actually have more in common, especially when it comes to what they want to see in a postwar Afghanistan: a stable country that does not serve as a base for extremists to export terrorism. Both countries also are aligned in their opposition to militants from the Islamic State group.(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

Some enlisted soldiers can now promote before getting mandated training

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(AP Photo/Steve Helber)This Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2006 file photo shows members of Alpha Company of the 244th Quartermasters battalion march to the physical fitness track at the Ft. Lee Army base in Ft. Lee, Va. As much as President Donald Trump enjoys talking about winning and winners, the Confederate generals he vows will not have their names removed from U.S. military bases were not only on the losing side of rebellion against the United States, some weren't even considered good generals. Or even good men. The 10 generals include some who made costly battlefield blunders; others mistreated captured Union soldiers, some were slaveholders, and one was linked to the Ku Klux Klan after the war. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Many DoD bases expected to restrict travel ahead of holidays as COVID cases rise

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(Victoria Evans)Soldiers in initial military training at Fort Jackson, S. C., line up to eat, May 11, 2020. (Victoria Evans)

Military setting record COVID cases as nationwide numbers balloon

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Richard Eldridge, Air Force

Air Force Research Lab’s new shop will focus on small things packing big punches in space

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