Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

FILE - A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sign stands at the entrance of their offices in Atlanta on Tuesday, April 19, 2022. On Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2022, the head of nation's top public health agency announced a shake-up of the organization, in a bid to respond to ongoing criticism and try to make it more nimble. (AP Photo/Ron Harris, File)

One big lesson from the COVID pandemic

One big lesson from the COVID pandemic: you need solid data to mount an effective response. And that was one of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s…

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(AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2020, file photo, a COVID-19 vaccination record card is shown at Seton Medical Center in Daly City, Calif. Los Angeles leaders are poised to enact one of the nation's strictest vaccine mandates, a sweeping measure that would require the shots for everyone entering a bar, restaurant, nail salon, gym or even a Lakers game. The City Council on Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021, is scheduled to consider the proposal and most members have said they support it as a way of preventing further COVID-019 surges. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

Task force eases COVID-19 screening guidance at federal facilities

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How Health and Human Services is helping with the medical emergency in Ukraine

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The American flag flies at half-staff outside the U.S. Capitol before a ceremony for former Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Washington. Reid will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol as colleagues and friends pay tribute to a hardscrabble Democrat who served five terms in the Senate. Reid will be honored Wednesday in the Capitol Rotunda during a ceremony closed to the public under COVID-19 protocols. (Al Drago/Pool via AP)

Congress is back today, and the federal budget is back on the agenda

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(Mass Communication Specialist Julio Rivera/U.S. Navy via AP)In this April 7, 2020, photo, released by the U.S. Navy, sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, who have tested negative for COVID-19 and are asymptomatic, are checked at local hotels in Guam in an effort to implement social distancing. People in Guam are used to a constant U.S. military presence on the strategic Pacific island, but some are nervous as hundreds of sailors from the coronavirus-stricken Navy aircraft carrier flood into hotels for quarantine. Officials insist they have enforced strict safety measures. (Mass Communication Specialist Julio Rivera/U.S. Navy via AP)

Navy turns heads by giving Huntington Ingalls a pass on COVID mandate

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The Capitol is seen from the Russell Senate Office Building during a delay in work on the Democrats' $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, March 5, 2021. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Senate Democrats unveil 2022 appropriations bills, back Biden’s planned federal pay raise

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Amelia Brust/Federal News Networkworkplace diversity

For federal accessibility managers, adding ‘A’ to new DEIA initiative is a welcome change

A recent executive order forces all of government to consider how the federal work environment — from the digital tools agencies use to the physical…

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A teacher, left, has her so-called

Agencies looking for industry ideas on tracking vaccinations among their employees

In today’s Federal Newscast, federal agencies are looking for private sector ideas on collecting vaccine information for their employees.

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Amelia Brust/Federal News Networkfederal employee, work, stress, health, retirement

Science, data, technology helped combat the pandemic. They can help long after

Emerging technologies like machine learning and predictive analytics can help public health officials quickly and accurately identify vulnerable, underserved segments of the population and efficiently get them the care and guidance they need.

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