Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The American flag flies at half-staff outside the U.S. Capitol before a ceremony for former Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 in Washington. Reid will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol as colleagues and friends pay tribute to a hardscrabble Democrat who served five terms in the Senate. Reid will be honored Wednesday in the Capitol Rotunda during a ceremony closed to the public under COVID-19 protocols. (Al Drago/Pool via AP)

Congress is back today, and the federal budget is back on the agenda

Members will resume budget talks that started late last week, which is encouraging given that the continuing resolution deadline is just a month away.

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(Mass Communication Specialist Julio Rivera/U.S. Navy via AP)In this April 7, 2020, photo, released by the U.S. Navy, sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, who have tested negative for COVID-19 and are asymptomatic, are checked at local hotels in Guam in an effort to implement social distancing. People in Guam are used to a constant U.S. military presence on the strategic Pacific island, but some are nervous as hundreds of sailors from the coronavirus-stricken Navy aircraft carrier flood into hotels for quarantine. Officials insist they have enforced strict safety measures. (Mass Communication Specialist Julio Rivera/U.S. Navy via AP)

Navy turns heads by giving Huntington Ingalls a pass on COVID mandate

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The Capitol is seen from the Russell Senate Office Building during a delay in work on the Democrats' $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, March 5, 2021. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Senate Democrats unveil 2022 appropriations bills, back Biden’s planned federal pay raise

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Amelia Brust/Federal News Networkworkplace diversity

For federal accessibility managers, adding ‘A’ to new DEIA initiative is a welcome change

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Amelia Brust/Federal News Networkfederal employee, work, stress, health, retirement

Science, data, technology helped combat the pandemic. They can help long after

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(Getty Images/iStockphoto/Sitthiphong)

Is the federal workforce due for a big growth spurt?

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(AP Photo/Mike Groll)FILE - This April 22, 2014, file photo shows an employment application form on a table at a job fair in Hudson, N.Y. Middle-age white Americans with limited education are increasingly dying younger, on average, than other middle-age U.S. adults, a trend driven by their dwindling economic opportunities, research by two Princeton University economists has found. The economists, Anne Case and Angus Deaton, argue in a paper released Thursday, March 23, 2017, that the loss of steady middle-income jobs for those with high school degrees or less has triggered broad problems for this group. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

With Biden’s 2022 budget, civilian agencies are due for a hiring spree

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Anne Schuchat

Leading infectious disease expert nominated for Sammies career achievement award

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Amelia Brust/Federal News Network

Federal agencies begin to lift mask requirements for fully-vaccinated employees

Masks are no longer required for fully-vaccinated employees, contractors and visitors inside federal buildings, the Office of Management and Budget told…

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AP/Jose Luis MaganaDeputy Secretary of Defense Kathleen Hicks, center, arrives at the Pentagon, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

DoD says service members and civilian employees can leave masks at home if vaccinated

In today’s Federal Newscast, the Pentagon says military members and civilian employees can do their jobs without masks, as long as they’re fully vaccinated.

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NIHNIH, National Institutes of Health building

An update on a CDC program to improve the total health of people

The words workplace and worker health have taken on whole new meanings in the year plus long pandemic.

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