Kathleen Hicks

defense budget

How much does inflation actually matter to DoD and can it be fixed?

Congress says DoD’s budget isn’t big enough for price increases, however lawmakers hold the purse strings

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Amelia Brust/Federal News Network

DoD budget contains big pay raise and largest research investment ever

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(DoD photo by Lisa Ferdinando)Deputy Secretary of Defense Kathleen H. Hicks participates in a virtual Center for Strategic and International Studies Smart Women, Smart Power conversation, the Pentagon, Washington, D.C., Oct. 1, 2021. (DoD photo by Lisa Ferdinando)

DoD mulls how to return to office, promises telework is here to stay

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Why better decision-making, not just money, is key to military superiority

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DoD

DoD names CIO as acting official to deliver ‘end-to-end’ integration on data, AI

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Lloyd Austin

Pentagon Reservation raises health protection policy level as Omicron spreads

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DoD CDO sees leadership shakeup as agency ‘doubling down’ on data goals

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Anthony Brown

DoD’s new rules on extremism still don’t have enough punch, lawmaker says

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(DoD photo by Lisa Ferdinando)Deputy Secretary of Defense Kathleen H. Hicks participates in a virtual Center for Strategic and International Studies Smart Women, Smart Power conversation, the Pentagon, Washington, D.C., Oct. 1, 2021. (DoD photo by Lisa Ferdinando)

Could we soon see hybrid electric tanks? Pentagon says maybe

In today’s Federal Newscast, the Pentagon is charging up a plan to electrify some of its vehicles.

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JAIC thinks AI might solve DoD’s struggles with contract writing systems

The Joint Artificial Intelligence Center wants to see if AI algorithms can navigate the Federal Acquisition Regulation and build an RFP themselves.

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FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2021, file photo provided by the Department of Defense, Hickam 15th Medical Group hosts the first COVID-19 mass vaccination on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Military service members must immediately begin to get the COVID-19 vaccine, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said in a memo Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2021, ordering service leaders to “impose ambitious timelines for implementation.” (U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Anthony Nelson Jr./Department of Defense via AP)

DoD requires civilian employees to be vaccinated by Nov. 22

The Pentagon issued its guidance for civilian employees on Monday, giving workers a little less than two months to get inoculated.

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