retirement tsunami

Amelia Brust/Federal News Network

Is 2021 the year of the federal retirement comeback?

More federal employees have retired so far during the first six months of the year compared to the same period in 2020, according to data from the Office…

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Federal retirements dropped in 2019, as employees cite wide variety of motivations to stay or go

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Headed for the door? Or working longer? Tell us about your federal retirement plans

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Too early to call it a ‘tsunami,’ but could 2018 retirements signal the start of something else?

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Getty Images/iStockphoto/HUNG KUO CHUNretirement

Are more federal employees leaving government under Trump administration?

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Though more feds retired in 2017 compared to the previous year, it hardly triggered a ‘tsunami’

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Still waiting for the brain drain …

Just before the turn of the century experts predicted a brain drain, a tidal wave of retirements that would leave Uncle Sam less intelligent than a bag…

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TrumpExit on hold? In the works? Not gonna happen?

Despite the warnings of many federal prognosticators, the mass exodus of angry, frightened civil servants hasn’t happened.

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Average January retirement surge falls short of alarmist predictions

The latest data released by the Office of Personnel Management shows that in 2017, 15,317 federal employees filed to retire in January, historically the month when the most feds file for retirement. But that number, while large, is about 100 fewer than 2016, and falls short of 2015’s numbers by more than 3,300.

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