Tom Coburn

  • Coburn calls for partial federal job freeze as sequestration nears

    The Republican senator from Oklahoma is asking the Office of Management and Budget to require agencies to stop hiring for certain positions. Instead, he would like that funding put towards mission critical jobs that could be affected by sequestration cuts. Coburn, the ranking member of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, found 10 jobs listed on USAJobs.gov that he believes could be frozen. He says this would give agencies $1.4 million to spend on positions like border security officers and TSA screeners.

  • USPS makes case for ending Saturday delivery as postal reform push continues

    The U.S. Postal Service’s worsening financial situation led Postmaster General Pat Donahoe to announce last week the agency would end Saturday mail delivery beginning in August. But lawmakers on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee were divided over Donahoe’s announcement. The postmaster general told the committee during a hearing Wednesday the decision was necessary to save $2 billion a year and to begin shoring up the service’s funding shortfalls.

  • USPS employees to see less overtime, more buyouts under 5-day delivery plan

    Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said the service can no longer afford to delivery first class mail six-days a week. He said cutting back by one day a week would save about $2 billion a year. USPS still would have a $14 billion deficit and needs help from Congress to address other fiscal challenges.

  • Lawmakers call on President to fill widespread IG vacancies

    House and Senate lawmakers have called on President Barack Obama to fill inspector general vacancies at six large agencies, including open spots at the Departments of Homeland Security and State.

  • Lawmakers up in arms over report on Army payroll problems

    The U.S. Army’s $47 billion in annual military payroll accounts has caused major woes for some soldiers trying to collect their pay, according to a new report by the Government Accountability Office. As a result of the Army being unable to track and collect data on numerous pay errors including over payments, under payments, data entry errors and fraud, active duty soldiers are not receiving the correct compensation and this has a bipartisan team of lawmakers furious.

  • Beef jerky, reality shows, beer: Coburn tells DoD to cut it all out

    A new report, called the Department of Everything, says DoD spending over the next 10 years will total almost $68 billion on non- military goods and services. Some recent examples include a smartphone app to help military members manage their caffeine intake and the sponsorship of a workshop by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency called the 100 Year Starship project, which included a session called, “Did Jesus die for Klingons too?”

  • More than $18B spent on ‘outdated and outlandish’ projects, Coburn report says

    Sen. Tom Coburn’s report on government waste details spending on 100 government projects, programs and initiatives at a cost of $18 billion. The report also points to potentially systemic issues affecting federal management, such as the lack of strategic sourcing in federal acquisition and the General Services Administration’s outdated contract schedules.

  • Bill would give DoD incentives to audit its books on time

    New legislation from several senators would let DoD reprogram funds without congressional approval.

  • Incomplete SSA records lead to payments to dead people

    Information regarding a person’s death is not always correctly transferred between the Social Security Administration’s databases, according to a new report from the agency’s inspector general. As a result, various agencies may be sending money to dead people or fraudsters.

  • CBO: House bill requiring detailed program inventories will cost $100M

    A House bill designed to reduce government redundancy by requiring agencies to provide detailed reports about the programs they operate will cost about $100 million for agencies to implement, according to a Congressional Budget Office analysis. The Taxpayers Right to Know Act, introduced by Rep. James Lankford, would required agencies to publicly post detailed information about each of the program they operate, including costs and the number of employee dedicated to them.