Army testing new malaria drug for deployed troops

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A new drug developed by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, called Tafenoquine, has the potential to eradicate malaria. It recently received approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Now the Army is testing how it protects deployed troops. To learn more, Federal News Network’s Eric White spoke with Maj. Victor Zottig, product manager for Tafenoquine...

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Best listening experience is on Chrome, Firefox or Safari. Subscribe to Federal Drive’s daily audio interviews on Apple Podcasts or PodcastOne.

A new drug developed by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, called Tafenoquine, has the potential to eradicate malaria. It recently received approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Now the Army is testing how it protects deployed troops. To learn more, Federal News Network’s Eric White spoke with Maj. Victor Zottig, product manager for Tafenoquine at the Army’s Medical Materiel Development Activity, on Federal Drive with Tom Temin.

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    Army testing new malaria drug for deployed troops

    Read more
    FILE - This file photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a feeding female Anopheles Stephensi mosquito crouching forward and downward on her forelegs on a human skin surface, in the process of obtaining its blood meal through its sharp, needle-like labrum, which it had inserted into its human host. Ugandan Brian Gitta, 25, has won in 2018 a prestigious engineering prize for a non-invasive malaria test kit that is hoped to become widely used across Africa. (James Gathany/CDC via AP, File)

    Army testing new malaria drug for deployed troops

    Read more