Facilities/Construction

  • Tangherlini aims to restore confidence in GSA

    The new acting administrator of the General Services Administration has written to agency employees telling them not to allow the mistakes of a few affect the achievement of their goals. Tangherlini, who formerly served as the chief financial officer of the Treasury Department, said GSA will “redouble” its efforts to the core values of delivering efficient and effective services. GSA chief Martha Johnson resigned Monday and two of her top deputies were fired following the release of an inspector general’s report detailing excessive spending at an October 2010 regional training conference.

  • Navy divides focus between energy efficiencies, alternative fuels

    The military may be the biggest user of energy in the federal government, but the Navy is doing its part to lessen the load, according to Tom Hicks, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for energy.

  • Navy opens its first alternative fueling station

    Naval Facilities Engineering Command opened the first of three planned stations that pump E-85, a fuel made up mostly of ethanol. The Navy Secretary said he wants the service to cut is use of petroleum fuel by 50 percent and set a deadline of 2015.

  • Senator’s opposition kills BRAC request

    Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), chairwoman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, voiced her opposition Wednesday to the Defense Department’s latest BRAC request, effectively killing the measure.

  • Agencies to follow new greenhouse gas guidance

    Based on lessons learned over the last two years, new guidance is coming to help agencies refine their greenhouse gas efforts.

  • Army drafts RFP to attract renewable energy projects

    Army would agree to buy energy from private plants on Army land but cut the plants off from the electric grid in the event of an emergency. The final solicitation could be out by this spring.

  • House passes bill to streamline process for disposing of excess federal property

    The House unanimously voted Tuesday to create a new process for disposing of the federal government’s 14,000 excess properties, beginning with a pilot program to sell off more than a dozen of the most profitable facilities. Under the law, agencies would be able to keep a portion of the proceeds from the sale of real property. The bill would also create a comprehensive database compiling a list of all of the federal government’s real property.

  • Tool helps agencies cut costs on green gov goals

    Agencies have an April 20 deadline to join a renewable energy certificate (REC) solicitation that can help them save money on reaching green goals.

  • FTC: Proposed relocation ‘wholly unnecessary’

    The four sitting commissioners of the Federal Trade Commission have ”grave concerns” about a House committee’s plan to relocate the agency out of its historic Pennsylvania Ave. location into a privately held building in Southwest, Washington D.C. Eileen Harrington, FTC’s executive director, joined In Depth with Francis Rose to discuss a plan in Congress that would require the FTC to relocate to make room for the National Gallery of Art.

  • Senate bill aims to speed up elimination of excess federal properties

    Bipartisan legislation in the Senate aims to streamline the elimination of excess federal properties by setting up a council within agencies and the Office of Management and Budget and creating government-wide property disposal goals.

  • Unpaid overtime: The long commute

    Security checks at federal and military bases are a fact of life. But when it’s a 100 percent effort, lots of people spend lots of time doing it, Senior Correspondent Mike Causey says. Many feds work a lot of voluntary overtime but how much is too much?

  • Rising gas prices add more volatility to DoD budget

    The services are spending $31 million more every time oil prices increased $1 a barrel. The unexpected increase in costs is forcing the Pentagon to take even a deeper dive to find areas to save or avoid spending on in both the short and long term. DoD sees improved acquisitions as a major area for further potential spending reductions.

  • DoD asks Congress for more BRAC

    Department of Defense officials told Congress that if they can’t close military bases, they’ll have to take more money out of forces, training and modernization.

  • Treasury’s paperless initiative means no more paper benefit checks

    Those who are already receiving paper checks for federal benefit payments have until March 1, 2013, to sign up for direct deposit or direct express.