SES

  • David Dye, Federal Human Capital Group, Deloitte

    If you believe the surveys, employee engagement has been declining across the federal government for years. A recent Presidential Personnel memo makes the Senior Executive Service accountable for several agencies’ employee engagement through the SES performance management system. So how do you go about increasing engagement? David Dye, a director in Deloitte’s Federal Human Capital Group, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to offer some answers.

  • Julia Ziegler, Web Manager, Federal News Radio

    We’ve heard lots of ideas lately on how to fix the problems with the Senior Executive Service. But what would the SES look like if the government wiped it out and started over? Federal News Radio examined this issue in our special report, Fixing the SES. Web Manager Julia Ziegler joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive to relay some of your comments.

  • Carol Bonosaro, President, Senior Executives Association

    “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there.” That’s how Carol Bonosaro views the current attempts to reform the Senior Executive Service. Bonosaro, the president of the Senior Executives Association, has written a commentary on FederalNewsRadio.com responding to the “Fixing the SES” series. On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, Emily Kopp asked Bonosaro to look back on the history of reforms to the SES — a history nearly as old as the service itself.

  • Do leaders have the stomach for real SES reform?

    If there is to be major reform within the Senior Executive Service, the government needs the appetite to carefully consider exactly what problems it is solving, what it wants the SES to be and how best to get there, says Carol Bonosaro in a new commentary.

  • How to fix the SES: Wipe the slate clean

    Political leaders of all stripes have long called for reforming the Senior Executive Service. But what if instead of fixing the SES’ current problems, the government wiped the slate clean and started from scratch? In part four of Federal News Radio’s special report, Fixing the SES, current and former members of the service discuss what the key ingredients would be in a new SES recipe.

  • Emily Kopp, Reporter, Federal News Radio

    The Office of Personnel Management needs to do more to ensure meaningful distinctions are being made when it comes to performance ratings and awards for members of the Senior Executive Service. That’s according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office. Federal News Radio’s Emily Kopp joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with more details from the report.

  • GAO: Ratings inflation, shrinking performance awards trouble SES system

    What’s the difference between an amazing senior executive and a pretty good one? Not much, says the Government Accountability Office after reviewing agencies’ pay-for-performance compensation systems.

  • Emily Kopp, Reporter, Federal News Radio

    If asked, many people with knowledge of the federal government would agree that problems surround the Senior Executive Service. But if you ask what the problem is, you’ll get very different answers. For example, of the 890 career senior executives who left government in fiscal 2014, just two were fired for discipline or performance. Is that because the laws make it hard to fire executives even when they do something scandalous? Or is it because leaders don’t want to use the authorities at their disposal? On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, and as part of her special report, “Fixing the SES,” Federal News Radio’s Emily Kopp dissected the problems with help from Eddie Ribas. He’s an SES member and human-resources expert who has worked at many agencies, including the Office of Personnel Management and now the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

  • Fixing the SES: The truth about accountability

    Does the federal government hold members of the Senior Executive Service accountable for their actions? In part three of Federal News Radio’s special report, Fixing the SES, current and former senior executives respond candidly to the criticism.

  • Jeri Buchholz, Chief Human Capital Officer, NASA

    Political leaders from both the White House and Congress are offering up ways to improve the SES. The latest in our special report, Fixing the SES, is “Why We Stay: SES In Their Own Words.” Jeri Buchholz, an SES member and chief human capital officer at NASA, is taking an enterprise-wide view of the system. She tells Federal News Radio’s Emily Kopp, the SES has its faults but it’s essential to the government.