Ukraine

Amelia Brust/Federal News Network

How companies can protect themselves and the country in an era of cyberwarfare

Even cyberattacks that are launched by powerful governments often rely on the deception of public officials or employees, which means these attacks can…

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Getty Images/iStockphoto/HYWARDSCISA

At CISA, even the chief of staff has been marinated in cybersecurity

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State Department team gets Sammies nod for efforts to resettle Afghan refugees

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How Health and Human Services is helping with the medical emergency in Ukraine

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FILE - In this image taken from footage provided by the Ukrainian Defense Ministry Press Service, a Ukrainian soldiers use a launcher with US Javelin missiles during military exercises in Donetsk region, Ukraine, Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022. The Russian invasion of Ukraine is the largest conflict that Europe has seen since World War II, with Russia conducting a multi-pronged offensive across the country. The Russian military has pummeled wide areas in Ukraine with air strikes and has conducted massive rocket and artillery bombardment resulting in massive casualties. (Ukrainian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP, File)

Contractors are eyeing possible passage of a big aid-to-Ukraine bill

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People receive humanitarian aid in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, Saturday, May 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Andriy Andriyenko)

A call to Defense contractors: Ukraine doesn’t just need weapons – but humanitarian aid too

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The U.S. Capitol dome is seen past the base of the Washington Monument just before sunrise in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers faced a partial government shutdown early Saturday after Democrats refused to meet President Donald Trump's demands for $5 billion to start erecting a border wall with Mexico. Overall, more than 800,000 federal employees would see their jobs disrupted, including more than half who would be forced to continue working without pay. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Capitol Hill is a bustling place this week, starting with federal agencies and baby formula

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Chuck Schumer, Maria Cantwell

One Senator thinks a Roe v. Wade overturn could affect the federal workforce

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Eric White/Federal News NetworkDavid Berteau

Defense Industrial Base faces short and long term challenges

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Lloyd Austin, Antony Blinken, Volodymyr Zelenskyy

On Capitol Hill, a deepening commitment to keep arms flowing to Ukraine

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Ukraine’s Prosecutor General Iryna Venediktova speaks with refugees outside a processing center in Lviv, Ukraine on March 22, 2022. She has stationed prosecutors at refugee centers across the country and at border crossings to extract evidence from millions of displaced Ukrainians and register them as victims potentially eligible for compensation. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)

Federal employees can now send portion of their pay to help Ukrainian refugees

In today’s Federal Newscast, the Office of Personnel Management is giving all federal workers the option to contribute to humanitarian efforts in Ukraine.

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FILE - The U.S. Capitol building is seen before sunrise on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, March. 21, 2022. With an urgent funding request stuck in Congress, the Health Resources and Services Administration says it can no longer cover medical bills for COVID tests and treatments for uninsured people and will stop taking claims at midnight Tuesday. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe, File)

The worsening Ukraine situation causes Congress to reexamine the defense budget

Congress is on recess this week, which may be a good thing with COVID making its ugly appearance in both chambers. And that’s why maybe a $10 billion COVID…

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Head shot of Brian Chidester

A passion for marketing

Brian Chidester, Industry vice president – Worldwide Public Sector at Genesys, joined host Mark Amtower on this week’s Amtower Off Center for a wide ranging discussion on trends in government contracting.

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