The ‘old-fashioned’ kind of intelligence


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It seems like every show for the past six months has touched on artificial intelligence. Well, it’s time to talk about old-fashioned intelligence.

In the federal community, the term “intelligence” normally does not involve one’s rank in a standardized test. Intelligence is the analytical ability that a human being has to reach a conclusion after he or she is presented with a series of facts. These can be 2 million facts from a large data set or just three facts from an investigation.

Dr. Frederic Lemieux
Dr. Frederic Lemieux, program director, Intelligence & Cybersecurity Programs, Georgetown University School of Continuous Studies

Frederic Lemieux, program director of the Intelligence & Cybersecurity Programs at the Georgetown University School of Continuous Studies, joined host John Gilory on this week’s Federal Tech Talk to explain an academic approach that is certainly no replacement for experience, but rather supplemental.

A well-structured classroom experience can help to learn analytical approaches quicker when combined with on the job training. Being exposed to risk management and understanding intelligence collection can put decisions in perspective for the chief information security officers of the world.

Lemieux has a doctorate in criminology, which gives him a background to discuss one aspect that may or may not be discussed in the work environment: Ethics. That is the value of a wide range of individual thoughts — a topic can be tabled for discussion and several perspectives emerge that may surprise some participants.

Today’s federal world of insider threat, transparent data, and remote access is a fruitful field for systems administrators and executives to put the job title of “Information Security Analyst” to the test.