Business of Government Hour

Cybersecurity risks of smart city technologies: A conversation with Alison Post and Alex Pan

This content is provided by the IBM Center for the Business  of Government.

Mondays at 11:00 a.m. & Fridays at 1:00 p.m.

The Business of Government Hour, hosted by Michael J. Keegan, features a conversation with government executives and thought leaders who are changing the way government does business. The show explores topics such as leadership, management, technology, innovation, public service, as well as the mission of government in the 21st century.

ON THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

A Conversation on the Cybersecurity Risks of Smart City Technologies. What is “smart cities” technology? Do all smart city technologies pose equivalent cybersecurity risks? What are some of the most prevalent cyber threats posed by these technologies? Join host Michael Keegan has he explores these questions and more with Alison Post and Alex Pan co-authors, The Cybersecurity Risks of Smart City Technologies: What Do The Experts Think? Original Broadcast Date May 10, 2021

LISTEN TO THE FULL SHOW:

GUEST BIOGRAPHY:

 

Alexandra Pan is a Master’s student in Transportation Engineering and joined TSRC in the fall of 2018. She is working on projects about shared mobility and travel behavior. Prior to studying at Berkeley, Alex completed her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering at Columbia University in 2016, and worked at General Motors as a Hybrid/Electric Propulsion Systems Engineer. Alex’s interests other than transportation include reading, watching baseball, and Olympic weightlifting.

Alison Post is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Global Metropolitan Studies. Her research lies at the intersection of comparative urban politics and comparative political economy, with regional emphases on Latin America and South Asia. It examines several related themes: regulation and business-government relations, decentralization, and the politics of urban policy more broadly. She is the author of Foreign and Domestic Investment in Argentina: The Politics of Privatized Infrastructure (Cambridge University Press, 2014) and articles in the Annual Review of Political Science, Comparative Politics, Governance, Perspectives on Politics, Politics & Society, Studies in Comparative International Development, World Development, and other outlets. She has been named a Clarence Stone Scholar (an early career award) by the Urban Politics Section of the American Political Science Association, and received U.C. Berkeley’s Carol D. Soc award for mentoring graduate students. Her doctoral dissertation, “Liquid Assets and Fluid Contracts: Explaining the Uneven Effects of Water and Sanitation Privatization,” won the 2009 William Anderson award from the American Political Science Association for the best dissertation in the general field of federalism, intergovernmental relations, state or local politics. She has served as a a Marshall Scholar, a postdoctoral research scholar with the Committee on Global Thought at Columbia University, a Visiting Researcher at the Centro de Estudios de Estado y Sociedad in Buenos Aires and the U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (E.C.L.A.C.) in Santiago, and as a Researcher at L.S.E. Urban Research in London. She is currently the President of the Urban and Local Politics section of the American Political Science Association and Chair of the Steering Committee for the Red de Economía Política de America Latina (Repal). aepost@berkeley.edu

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The Business Of Government Hour

MONDAYS at 11:00 A.M. and FRIDAYS at 1:00 P.M.

Michael J. Keegan, Leadership Fellow, IBM Center for The Business of Government

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